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Watch Alison Brie Do Impressions of Internet Memes
Watch Alison Brie Do Impressions of Internet Memes
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Come on, Broadway. When we said we wanted fresh perspectives and appeal to a wider demographic, we didn’t mean it like this. Not like this. But maybe we’re just being bitter—maybe this staged reinterpretation of Max’s bawdy prose will echo strongly in the tradition of the early, raunchier days of Greek comedy (as in actual Greeks, not the Greek system) and be presented in a manner where it is a radical satire of the life of the American Douche as opposed to some kind of celebration, which it often feels like (whether that’s how Max means it or not).
And it’s certainly not a bad thing that Broadway is trying to appeal to bros—the theatre should be for everyone. But surely there was another way than bringing I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell to the stage. Surely. Hell, rewrite some Andrew Lloyd Webber lyrics and give us some “Jellicle Songs for Jellicle Frats!” Do a boozy, collegiate take on Tom Stoppard and call it Brosencrantz and Chilldenstern Are Dead. 

Adaptation of Douche-Lit Classic Premiering Off-Broadway in June
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Keith Haring’s art is like a visual punch in the face. A true trailblazer during New York City’s street culture movement in the 1980s, the inimitable graffiti virtuoso’s playfully subversive imagery slapped society with a unique call-to-action that cleverly commanded open and direct discussions about sex, racism, war, power and violence. Following his untimely death in 1990 at the age of 31, the artist’s signature silhouettes, iconic bold lines, and legendary phrases live on through thoughtful brand collaborations managed by the Keith Haring Foundation, as well as exclusive exhibitions at major museums across the globe.  
A social activist at heart, Haring’s powerful political messages are as impactful today as they were at the height of his career. To celebrate his legacy, the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris) and Le CENTQUATRE present one of the artist’s largest retrospectives to date. The Political Line runs from April 19 through August 18and boasts nearly 250 striking images on canvas, subway walls and tarpaulins, including such works as A Pile of Crowns, For Jean-Michel Basquiat (1988), Brazil (1989), and Andy Mouse – New Coke (1985), a tribute to Haring’s close friend and mentor, Andy Warhol. The CENTQUATRE art space will showcase 20 large-format works, most notably The Ten Commandments (1985), which is a mighty set of 25-foot panels that cleverly merge Biblical references with socio-political iconography. In short, it’s bucket list-worthy for Haring diehards.

Keith Haring’s Humanity Heads to Paris
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The Knife are no longer interested in working from the inside-out to dismantle the system; they’re not interested in three minute subversive pop music as a way to open minds. The master’s tools, the master’s house, etc. They’ve instead established a base camp on the fringes of all we hold dear and are bombarding conventions of art, gender, and economy with musical weapons that defy comprehension. As Karin sings on the album’s closing moment, probably the only traditionally defined “song” on the album, “Ready To Lose:” “I’m ready to lose a privilege.” 

Ready to Lose a Privilege: The Knife’s Messy, Brilliant Shaking the Habitual
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A Lot of People Think That Cher Is Dead
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Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
Check out Cat Power’s gorgeous video for “Manhattan”
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Bye, Charlie! Christopher Abbott Is Breaking Up With Girls
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Did you know you wanted James Franco to play him?Yeah, that’s kind of how the movie started. I had this idea, and when I wrote it down in a quick treatment—this idea of just characters and scenes—I emailed it to James and he was like, “I’m down, let’s do it.” And it just happened to coincide with spring break and I just hopped on a plane. There were all these girls dressed like Taylor Swift fucking in the hallway at the Holiday Inn where we were staying.
And in terms of the girls, did you know whom you wanted to cast? Was there always this idea of casting these people with very squeaky-clean personas and strip them of that?That was the dream. That was the ultimate to me, to have those girls be in the film. When I was writing it, when I was trying to come up with who should do it, I was like, those girls are of that culture and of that world and I like the idea of it working both ways. So yeah, that was the dream. I wanted that.
That add to the sort of nature that it was frightening and such a deviation from these people you always see in this one way.Of course! That’s what’s so exciting. It’s great to see people in a way you’ve never seen them. I find it’s exciting to see people you’re used to being one way going the other. Anyway, it just made sense.
And did they have any reservations about the things they had to do in the film?I would honestly say, working with those girls and the whole Disney thing and everything, I didn’t know what to expect, and I didn’t know how far to push them. It was one of the most surprising parts of making this movie, how bold they were and how hardcore they are. And obviously, it’s a movie and these are characters and it’s a different type of thing. I explained to them, it’s a different type of thing than you’ve ever done before and a different type of filmmaking, and the idea behind it is something you haven’t experienced, and the way I make films is something different, and the acting style is different. Once they understood that, it was pretty obvious they were excited and went for it. It was crazy how good they were and how they were always there. There weren’t any arguements about anything.

Talking with Harmony Korine about Spring Breakers
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This Harlem Shake Thing Is Getting Out of Control
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As deliciously evil and thrilling as it is visually-rich and haunting, Park Chan-wook’s fantastical gothic thriller Stoker plays out like an erotic waltz with sinister intentions. As his first English-language film, the acclaimed Korean director has crafted a quiet kind of suspense that shows the graceful unraveling of an isolated American family. 


Speaking With Director Park Chan-wook About His Stunning ‘Stoker’