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*CLAPPING*
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To his credit, Butterfield, who was recently cast as the lead in the sci-fi epic Ender’s Game,  recognizes the unique nature of his position. “Being an actor does give  me the opportunity to do and see things I wouldn’t otherwise be able  to,” he concedes. “Come to think of it, I’m like Hugo.” That would be  Hugo Cabret, the orphan Butterfield plays in Scorsese’s film. He  secretly lives in the walls of a Paris train station, emerging only to  get tangled up in a grand romp with costars Ben Kingsley and Chloë  Mortez. Working with Marty—known for his ability to handpick pint-sized  actors destined to become full-fledged stars (Jodie Foster, Juliette  Lewis)—bodes well for Butterfield. Though still young, the cobalt-eyed  comer is looking forward to “playing characters that have a bit more  world experience. If anyone wants to make Young Bond,” he says. “I’m  your guy.”
Next Year’s Best and Brightest in Movies, Music, Art, and More
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How was Scorsese as a director? Marty really is an amazing director.  I know that’s an obvious thing to  say but the way he set up shots and the detail that he attends to is  quite something.  I could see that early on when watching bits of  playback in his tent.  And now I’ve seen the film I can see how that  attention to detail has really paid off – it’s so beautiful. He’s not a  director that tells you to do it in a particular way, instead he  suggests different ways and he was always so encouraging. This lets you  come up with your own ideas of how to play the scene and that in turn  affects the other actors performances. The other thing I’ve come away  with is a real appreciation of film.  All through shooting, he’d suggest  films for me to watch.  I’m now really in to Kurosawa, and before I met  Marty I’d never heard of him.  Marty also shared with me some of the  early films he enjoyed as a boy and young man, I’ve got to see some of  them now and can see what inspired him to be the great film maker that  he is.
Asa Butterfield on Hugo, Bonding with Chloe Moretz, and His Dream Role
How was Scorsese as a director? Marty really is an amazing director.  I know that’s an obvious thing to  say but the way he set up shots and the detail that he attends to is  quite something.  I could see that early on when watching bits of  playback in his tent.  And now I’ve seen the film I can see how that  attention to detail has really paid off – it’s so beautiful. He’s not a  director that tells you to do it in a particular way, instead he  suggests different ways and he was always so encouraging. This lets you  come up with your own ideas of how to play the scene and that in turn  affects the other actors performances. The other thing I’ve come away  with is a real appreciation of film.  All through shooting, he’d suggest  films for me to watch.  I’m now really in to Kurosawa, and before I met  Marty I’d never heard of him.  Marty also shared with me some of the  early films he enjoyed as a boy and young man, I’ve got to see some of  them now and can see what inspired him to be the great film maker that  he is.
Asa Butterfield on Hugo, Bonding with Chloe Moretz, and His Dream Role
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When I speak to Asa Butterfield later today, how am I supposed to contain my jealousy that, at the age of fourteen, he got to star in a Scorsese film? How?