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Watch a Young Harmony Korine Talk ‘Julien Donkey-Boy’ & Dogme 95
Watch a Young Harmony Korine Talk ‘Julien Donkey-Boy’ & Dogme 95
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I used to sit in my room and think like, what if someone had a gun to your head and you had no fingers, and they said to write a book about the history of, I don’t know, prostitution, and you have three hours to push away on that keyboard—what would that look like? And then I would just try to do it. Or let’s say someone duct-taped a tree branch to your hand and then gave you a huge bowl of ink to dip it in and said that you had thirty five minutes to render your version of the Mona Lisa on this canvas. A lot of it was just playing games with myself to see where it would go.
HARMONY KORINE
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Worst Beating: An illiterate fifth grade teacher I had from the Ozarks burned my cheek with a scalding metal spoon. I had caught her meditating in the dark after school — she had made an altar out of hundreds of stuffed animals. She was burning a tiny effigy of her husband. The hot spoon was a silent reminder of what was to come if I dared inform the authorities. Ten years later, this same woman went on to become a prominent member of the House of Representatives.
Inspirations:Peace of mind. A mellow life. Crunk music. Investing in spy equipment and communist memorabilia. Having dance contests with myself. Placing last in the local triathlon. All of these things, plus a firm belief in the Lord.
Harmony Korine Takes Our Pop Quiz
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Stylistically, it’s something more aggressive. It’s something I’ve been working for. I’ve been trying to get to the point of being able to make a film like this for a while. On a technical and aesthetic level I’ve wanted to try this almost, like, mania in a different type of movie. It works like music or something; it’s meant to be more like a feeling, more aggressive, something that’s difficult to articulate. I wanted it to work on you in a very physical way, to wash over, to look like it’s been lit with Skittles.
HARMONY KORINE
Stylistically, it’s something more aggressive. It’s something I’ve been working for. I’ve been trying to get to the point of being able to make a film like this for a while. On a technical and aesthetic level I’ve wanted to try this almost, like, mania in a different type of movie. It works like music or something; it’s meant to be more like a feeling, more aggressive, something that’s difficult to articulate. I wanted it to work on you in a very physical way, to wash over, to look like it’s been lit with Skittles.
HARMONY KORINE
Stylistically, it’s something more aggressive. It’s something I’ve been working for. I’ve been trying to get to the point of being able to make a film like this for a while. On a technical and aesthetic level I’ve wanted to try this almost, like, mania in a different type of movie. It works like music or something; it’s meant to be more like a feeling, more aggressive, something that’s difficult to articulate. I wanted it to work on you in a very physical way, to wash over, to look like it’s been lit with Skittles.
HARMONY KORINE
Stylistically, it’s something more aggressive. It’s something I’ve been working for. I’ve been trying to get to the point of being able to make a film like this for a while. On a technical and aesthetic level I’ve wanted to try this almost, like, mania in a different type of movie. It works like music or something; it’s meant to be more like a feeling, more aggressive, something that’s difficult to articulate. I wanted it to work on you in a very physical way, to wash over, to look like it’s been lit with Skittles.
HARMONY KORINE
Stylistically, it’s something more aggressive. It’s something I’ve been working for. I’ve been trying to get to the point of being able to make a film like this for a while. On a technical and aesthetic level I’ve wanted to try this almost, like, mania in a different type of movie. It works like music or something; it’s meant to be more like a feeling, more aggressive, something that’s difficult to articulate. I wanted it to work on you in a very physical way, to wash over, to look like it’s been lit with Skittles.
HARMONY KORINE
Stylistically, it’s something more aggressive. It’s something I’ve been working for. I’ve been trying to get to the point of being able to make a film like this for a while. On a technical and aesthetic level I’ve wanted to try this almost, like, mania in a different type of movie. It works like music or something; it’s meant to be more like a feeling, more aggressive, something that’s difficult to articulate. I wanted it to work on you in a very physical way, to wash over, to look like it’s been lit with Skittles.
HARMONY KORINE
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When I write, when I think of characters, I never see people as all bad or all good. I always think characters with moral flaws or extreme characters are the most interesting for me. I don’t feel like anything begins or ends, I don’t think anything is ever one way. I never really felt like it’s good or bad. And I wouldn’t even say it’s completely honest; it’s more of a feeling. So, like, these girls do things and they reach levels of horror and beauty simultaneously, and that makes things fun.
HARMONY KORINE
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I used to sit in my room and think like, what if someone had a gun to your head and you had no fingers, and they said to write a book about the history of, I don’t know, prostitution, and you have three hours to push away on that keyboard—what would that look like? And then I would just try to do it. Or let’s say someone duct-taped a tree branch to your hand and then gave you a huge bowl of ink to dip it in and said that you had thirty five minutes to render your version of the Mona Lisa on this canvas. A lot of it was just playing games with myself to see where it would go.
—HARMONY KORINE
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Watch Harmony Korine’s Father Sol Korine’s 1981 PBS Documentary ‘Mouth Music’
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 I used to sit in my room and think like, what if someone had a gun to your head and you had no fingers, and they said to write a book about the history of, I don’t know, prostitution, and you have three hours to push away on that keyboard—what would that look like? And then I would just try to do it. Or let’s say someone duct-taped a tree branch to your hand and then gave you a huge bowl of ink to dip it in and said that you had thirty five minutes to render your version of the Mona Lisa on this canvas. A lot of it was just playing games with myself to see where it would go.

Uncovering ‘A Crack Up at the Race Riots’ With Harmony Korine
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"I was writing the titles of books I wanted to write, but then when I would look at the titles, I just liked the way they functioned on their own. There’s even one page where all it says is the word ‘hepburn.’ And that took me like four or five years to write that one page because I was trying to come up with what you’d think if the greatest novel consisted entirety of one word, what would that word be? And so I struggled with that for years and years and one day I saw the word “hepburn” and thought that word said so much, there was so much, the entire history of the world was just tangled up in those letters."
Harmony Korine
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Riff Raff Still Down for a ‘Spring Breakers 2,’ Reviews the Movie and Challenges James Franco
Riff Raff Still Down for a ‘Spring Breakers 2,’ Reviews the Movie and Challenges James Franco