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Le revelateur (1968)
Le revelateur (1968)
Le revelateur (1968)
Le revelateur (1968)
Le revelateur (1968)
Le revelateur (1968)
Le revelateur (1968)
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 I had no more material. I was being offered books to adapt and things like that, and I thought that was a good idea because I’d run out of my own material. Then I was pursuing those projects through producers in London and then having a life in New York. My marriage ended, I got involved with a different group of people, I fell in love with a French woman and so suddenly, I was thinking, well oh my gosh, these are really interesting things cinematically. It was almost as if I could say, well, I have no more material I need to go and have a life so I can have more material. That wasn’t it but it ended up being true. 
I chatted with Whit Stillman about The Cosmopolitans
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 I love the fact that you know, for example, you don’t really see people moan or cry so much with snot dripping down their face. When you have a crying scene, people have their makeup on and look nice, but in life we are all ugly sometimes—whether you’re you’re making love or fighting, etc.—and what’s important is just the beauty of the situation and the act. Sometimes when you cry you can be dignified but it’s also just honest.
Adèle Exarchopoulos
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“Don’t get a rabbit,” Whit Stillman tells me when I applaud one of the many clever one-liners peppered about his new television pilot The Cosmopolitans. His rebuttal comes in reference to a joke about the universal writerly struggle of not being able to work when one is alone, but not being able to get anything done with others are present—and it’s a sentiment that rings true for the director. His latest work comes only two years after his tap-dancing treatise on the female collegiate experience Damsels in Distress, but before Damsels, it was over a decade since we were graced with Whit’s erudite and cunningly playful charm in The Last Days of Disco. “I like delivering right around Christmas, I feel like it’s my lucky time to deliver a script,” says Whit, whose wonderfully witty The Cosmopolitans, produced by Amazon Studios, is now available for you to enjoy online.
And although it’s been twenty-four years since his masterpiece first feature Metropolitan, Stillman has remained faithful to his affections, populating his films with poised and learned yet aimless young adults hungry for love and social mobility, veering towards the crossroads of their lives. Harkening back to one of his best films, 1994‘s Barcelona, he now revisits the expatriate experience, swapping out Chris Eigman with his uncanny facsimile Adam Brody and bringing back Damsels’ Carrie MacLemore in the starring female role.
In the all-too-brief 26-minute pilot we follow a group of young Americans living in Paris as they try to mask and mend their broken hearts and eternal ennui by passing time in cafes and attempting to assimilate into upper crust Parisian society . As always, Stillman’s great ear for dialogue and affinity for refreshingly imperfect characters entices you into his very specific world—one in which we’re more than pleased to see an ultra-chic Chloe Sevigny pop in from time to time as the sophisticatedly snooty “Gold Coat Girl.”
INTERVIEW: Whit Stillman on The Cosmopolitans
“Don’t get a rabbit,” Whit Stillman tells me when I applaud one of the many clever one-liners peppered about his new television pilot The Cosmopolitans. His rebuttal comes in reference to a joke about the universal writerly struggle of not being able to work when one is alone, but not being able to get anything done with others are present—and it’s a sentiment that rings true for the director. His latest work comes only two years after his tap-dancing treatise on the female collegiate experience Damsels in Distress, but before Damsels, it was over a decade since we were graced with Whit’s erudite and cunningly playful charm in The Last Days of Disco. “I like delivering right around Christmas, I feel like it’s my lucky time to deliver a script,” says Whit, whose wonderfully witty The Cosmopolitans, produced by Amazon Studios, is now available for you to enjoy online.
And although it’s been twenty-four years since his masterpiece first feature Metropolitan, Stillman has remained faithful to his affections, populating his films with poised and learned yet aimless young adults hungry for love and social mobility, veering towards the crossroads of their lives. Harkening back to one of his best films, 1994‘s Barcelona, he now revisits the expatriate experience, swapping out Chris Eigman with his uncanny facsimile Adam Brody and bringing back Damsels’ Carrie MacLemore in the starring female role.
In the all-too-brief 26-minute pilot we follow a group of young Americans living in Paris as they try to mask and mend their broken hearts and eternal ennui by passing time in cafes and attempting to assimilate into upper crust Parisian society . As always, Stillman’s great ear for dialogue and affinity for refreshingly imperfect characters entices you into his very specific world—one in which we’re more than pleased to see an ultra-chic Chloe Sevigny pop in from time to time as the sophisticatedly snooty “Gold Coat Girl.”
INTERVIEW: Whit Stillman on The Cosmopolitans
“Don’t get a rabbit,” Whit Stillman tells me when I applaud one of the many clever one-liners peppered about his new television pilot The Cosmopolitans. His rebuttal comes in reference to a joke about the universal writerly struggle of not being able to work when one is alone, but not being able to get anything done with others are present—and it’s a sentiment that rings true for the director. His latest work comes only two years after his tap-dancing treatise on the female collegiate experience Damsels in Distress, but before Damsels, it was over a decade since we were graced with Whit’s erudite and cunningly playful charm in The Last Days of Disco. “I like delivering right around Christmas, I feel like it’s my lucky time to deliver a script,” says Whit, whose wonderfully witty The Cosmopolitans, produced by Amazon Studios, is now available for you to enjoy online.
And although it’s been twenty-four years since his masterpiece first feature Metropolitan, Stillman has remained faithful to his affections, populating his films with poised and learned yet aimless young adults hungry for love and social mobility, veering towards the crossroads of their lives. Harkening back to one of his best films, 1994‘s Barcelona, he now revisits the expatriate experience, swapping out Chris Eigman with his uncanny facsimile Adam Brody and bringing back Damsels’ Carrie MacLemore in the starring female role.
In the all-too-brief 26-minute pilot we follow a group of young Americans living in Paris as they try to mask and mend their broken hearts and eternal ennui by passing time in cafes and attempting to assimilate into upper crust Parisian society . As always, Stillman’s great ear for dialogue and affinity for refreshingly imperfect characters entices you into his very specific world—one in which we’re more than pleased to see an ultra-chic Chloe Sevigny pop in from time to time as the sophisticatedly snooty “Gold Coat Girl.”
INTERVIEW: Whit Stillman on The Cosmopolitans
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The Best Movies to Watch Without Leaving Bed: French Favorites, Part Deux
The Best Movies to Watch Without Leaving Bed: French Favorites, Part Deux
The Best Movies to Watch Without Leaving Bed: French Favorites, Part Deux
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See Memphis at IFC Center today!
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My movies, I made them just with my friends, the way every kid today makes a movie with your cellphone. I just started out doing it and they were basically made to startle people with their own values. People who thought they were open minded, I wanted to make fun of their limits and play with the boundaries of whatever was correct at the time. We were always making fun of the peace and love movement—and even though I certainly looked like a a hippie, I was more of a yippie. I would go to riots, but not so much for the political thing, I would go to get laid. Riots were a great place to make a date, you could always find people at riots. So it was always great cruising at riots. I tried to take that the spirit and make fun of it and make fun of myself by calling my films trash. Critics couldn’t say they were trash because I already said it.
John Waters on His Rise From LSD & Cruising to Celebrating 50 Years of Filmmaking at Lincoln Center
My movies, I made them just with my friends, the way every kid today makes a movie with your cellphone. I just started out doing it and they were basically made to startle people with their own values. People who thought they were open minded, I wanted to make fun of their limits and play with the boundaries of whatever was correct at the time. We were always making fun of the peace and love movement—and even though I certainly looked like a a hippie, I was more of a yippie. I would go to riots, but not so much for the political thing, I would go to get laid. Riots were a great place to make a date, you could always find people at riots. So it was always great cruising at riots. I tried to take that the spirit and make fun of it and make fun of myself by calling my films trash. Critics couldn’t say they were trash because I already said it.
John Waters on His Rise From LSD & Cruising to Celebrating 50 Years of Filmmaking at Lincoln Center
My movies, I made them just with my friends, the way every kid today makes a movie with your cellphone. I just started out doing it and they were basically made to startle people with their own values. People who thought they were open minded, I wanted to make fun of their limits and play with the boundaries of whatever was correct at the time. We were always making fun of the peace and love movement—and even though I certainly looked like a a hippie, I was more of a yippie. I would go to riots, but not so much for the political thing, I would go to get laid. Riots were a great place to make a date, you could always find people at riots. So it was always great cruising at riots. I tried to take that the spirit and make fun of it and make fun of myself by calling my films trash. Critics couldn’t say they were trash because I already said it.
John Waters on His Rise From LSD & Cruising to Celebrating 50 Years of Filmmaking at Lincoln Center
My movies, I made them just with my friends, the way every kid today makes a movie with your cellphone. I just started out doing it and they were basically made to startle people with their own values. People who thought they were open minded, I wanted to make fun of their limits and play with the boundaries of whatever was correct at the time. We were always making fun of the peace and love movement—and even though I certainly looked like a a hippie, I was more of a yippie. I would go to riots, but not so much for the political thing, I would go to get laid. Riots were a great place to make a date, you could always find people at riots. So it was always great cruising at riots. I tried to take that the spirit and make fun of it and make fun of myself by calling my films trash. Critics couldn’t say they were trash because I already said it.
John Waters on His Rise From LSD & Cruising to Celebrating 50 Years of Filmmaking at Lincoln Center
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There’s a haunting ineffable beauty that saturates the graceful films Mia Hansen-Løve. Their emotional potency lingers long after the credits roll, as the mood of her work reverberates through you for days. However varying in narrative, the tone inside which her films exist is filled with desire and longing that serves to remind us just how long letting go and forgetting can be. She spans time and exposes the small, human moments that add up a person’s life to tell incredibly delicate yet epic tales that are always harrowing in their heartbreak. And in what is sure to be one of our top films of 2014, Hansen-Løve’s latest film Eden will have its premiere later this week at the Toronto International Film Festival. As the follow-up to 2011’s Goodbye First Love, this new feature tackles many of the same emotional / psychological issues as her last, but rather than through the lens of a young woman’s broken heart, we’re given a story based the French filmmaker’s brother Sven (also her co-writer) and his experience as one of the pioneering DJs of the early 1990s French rave scene.
Watch the First Trailer for Mia Hansen-Løve’s ‘Eden’
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Goodbye First Love
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As a parent there’s a time when you have to start to make an effort to get to know your kids as separate human beings, and they have to look at you differently and not just as a parent. That’s a very worthwhile challenge because I’m sure when you’re around your parents you’re not exactly the way you are around your friends, and no matter how cool you are, you’re still the mom. Also I’m traveling a lot more and going to festivals and doing the things I really wanted to do when I was home. So my kids are like, what’s up with you and I tell them that this is actually who I was before I had you—so who are you? Let’s start from there.
Susan Sarandon on ‘The Last of Robin Hood,’ Toxic Relationships, and Discovering ‘The Bachelor’