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BlackBook
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Wise Guys (Les godelureaux), Chabrol (1961)
Wise Guys (Les godelureaux), Chabrol (1961)
Wise Guys (Les godelureaux), Chabrol (1961)
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I read all of Boris Van’s books. Before I was a director, I was already sort of an artist, but he was actually very influential to me, and when I started to direct I thought of him. So my universe was sort of inspired by his universe, and when I took on this, I brought many of my ideas but they were already influenced by him. So that was an interesting dynamic. 
Michel Gondry on Bringing His Deeply Personal ‘Mood Indigo’ to the Screen
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Get a Closer Look at New Films From Hal Hartley, Liv Ullmann, Bertrand Bonello + More
Get a Closer Look at New Films From Hal Hartley, Liv Ullmann, Bertrand Bonello + More
Get a Closer Look at New Films From Hal Hartley, Liv Ullmann, Bertrand Bonello + More
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After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.
Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.
A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames
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The Best Films to Watch Without Leaving Your Bed: Italian Style
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From Björk to Kylie Minogue: Michel Gondry’s Best Music Videos
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We were wrestling for a while with this idea of Karen and writing a husband and wife, and telling the story of a husband and wife partnership where there was real equality in it. I’m so fucking tired of going to the cinema and watching these marriages where the wives are nagging and annoying and demanding, and the husbands are ho-hum and want this younger, hotter thing. It just is like, enough already. What about all the relationships that I see my friends having, or my parents having? Where they work together, and they’re still madly in love with each other after decades. Where’s that? We wanted to do a partnership in which they go toe to toe with each other in the lab, and when he has to go to India for their mutual interest or experiment that involves him possibly looking for his ex-lover in a former life, or this life, or who knows what, it’s like the wife who should be jealous and afraid and timid is the one who’s like, “Go!”
Brit Marling on the Eroticism of Intimacy, the Pleasure of Collaboration, and ‘I Origins’
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There’s a scene in Mike Cahill’s debut feature Another Earth in which John (William Mapother) asks Rhoda (Brit Marling) what she would say if she met her other self. Without a beat, Marling says, “Better luck next time.” It’s a brief but powerful moment, imbued with the sentiment of Cahill’s latest film I Origins, a story that once again takes us on a scientific exploration of the human soul and its reincarnations, through the eyes of life’s most potent force—love. With Another Earth, the first feature collaboration between Cahill and Marling (having written and produced the film together), we were given a stunningly poetic and insightful character study about forgiveness and hope, wrapped inside a massive science fiction concept looming above. And as his career progresses, we’re able to observe the brilliance in Cahill’s affinity for finding the metaphysical in the mundane, allowing us to accept the grandeur of the ideas he presents, because at their core lies complex human drama and emotion that latches itself under your skin and holds you captive. 
Director Mike Cahill on the Romance and Heart of ‘I Origins’
There’s a scene in Mike Cahill’s debut feature Another Earth in which John (William Mapother) asks Rhoda (Brit Marling) what she would say if she met her other self. Without a beat, Marling says, “Better luck next time.” It’s a brief but powerful moment, imbued with the sentiment of Cahill’s latest film I Origins, a story that once again takes us on a scientific exploration of the human soul and its reincarnations, through the eyes of life’s most potent force—love. With Another Earth, the first feature collaboration between Cahill and Marling (having written and produced the film together), we were given a stunningly poetic and insightful character study about forgiveness and hope, wrapped inside a massive science fiction concept looming above. And as his career progresses, we’re able to observe the brilliance in Cahill’s affinity for finding the metaphysical in the mundane, allowing us to accept the grandeur of the ideas he presents, because at their core lies complex human drama and emotion that latches itself under your skin and holds you captive. 
Director Mike Cahill on the Romance and Heart of ‘I Origins’
There’s a scene in Mike Cahill’s debut feature Another Earth in which John (William Mapother) asks Rhoda (Brit Marling) what she would say if she met her other self. Without a beat, Marling says, “Better luck next time.” It’s a brief but powerful moment, imbued with the sentiment of Cahill’s latest film I Origins, a story that once again takes us on a scientific exploration of the human soul and its reincarnations, through the eyes of life’s most potent force—love. With Another Earth, the first feature collaboration between Cahill and Marling (having written and produced the film together), we were given a stunningly poetic and insightful character study about forgiveness and hope, wrapped inside a massive science fiction concept looming above. And as his career progresses, we’re able to observe the brilliance in Cahill’s affinity for finding the metaphysical in the mundane, allowing us to accept the grandeur of the ideas he presents, because at their core lies complex human drama and emotion that latches itself under your skin and holds you captive. 
Director Mike Cahill on the Romance and Heart of ‘I Origins’
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Enjoy the Silence: Happy Birthday, Harry Dean Stanton!
Enjoy the Silence: Happy Birthday, Harry Dean Stanton!
Enjoy the Silence: Happy Birthday, Harry Dean Stanton!
Enjoy the Silence: Happy Birthday, Harry Dean Stanton!
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THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION
THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION
THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION
THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION
THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION
THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION
THE BEST FILMS TO WATCH WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR BED: CRITERION EDITION