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Inside the Controversial Making of Donald Cammell & Nicolas Roeg’s ‘Performance’
Inside the Controversial Making of Donald Cammell & Nicolas Roeg’s ‘Performance’
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Alex Ross Perry on LISTEN UP PHILIP
Alex Ross Perry on LISTEN UP PHILIP
Alex Ross Perry on LISTEN UP PHILIP
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“I started reading the script and 10 or 15 pages into it I was put off by the character and blown away by some of the things he would consider saying to people,” says Jason Schwartzman on first reading Alex Ross Perry’s Listen Up Philip. “I felt like I needed to take a break…like I need to get out of here for a second.” But for Schwartzman, he found himself being pulling him back for more, eventually falling under the spell of Perry’s caustically charming world. And for a film about the personal and artistic struggles of a misanthropic novelist grappling with his latest work and the foibles of his love life, it’s only fitting that Schwartzman experienced reading the script the way he would a good book—piece by piece, finishing one chapter and allowing time for it to sink in before devouring the next.
For the undeniably lovable Schwartzman, whose strange and shrewd sense of comedic timing and talent has won over audiences since his wonderful breakout performance in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, Listen Up Philip allows him to show his nastier, more sadistic side. Alongside an impressive and brilliantly acted cast of Elisabeth Moss, Jonathan Pryce, Krysten Ritter, Dree Hemingway, and Josephine de La Baum, we follow the sardonic and narcissistic Philip as he awaits the publication of his second novel, fresh off the success of his debut. In an attempt to escape the city to write, and avoid the deteriorating relationship with his girlfriend (Moss), Philip flees for an isolated summer home owned by his literary idol (Pryce). Guided by an omnipresent narrator, shot on beautiful 16mm, and featuring a silky jazz score by Keegan DeWitt, Listen Up Philip possesses a refreshingly timeless touch that is as intricately-crafted as it is brutal.
Bitterly Charming: Jason Schwartzman Gets Abrasive for ‘Listen Up Philip’
“I started reading the script and 10 or 15 pages into it I was put off by the character and blown away by some of the things he would consider saying to people,” says Jason Schwartzman on first reading Alex Ross Perry’s Listen Up Philip. “I felt like I needed to take a break…like I need to get out of here for a second.” But for Schwartzman, he found himself being pulling him back for more, eventually falling under the spell of Perry’s caustically charming world. And for a film about the personal and artistic struggles of a misanthropic novelist grappling with his latest work and the foibles of his love life, it’s only fitting that Schwartzman experienced reading the script the way he would a good book—piece by piece, finishing one chapter and allowing time for it to sink in before devouring the next.
For the undeniably lovable Schwartzman, whose strange and shrewd sense of comedic timing and talent has won over audiences since his wonderful breakout performance in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, Listen Up Philip allows him to show his nastier, more sadistic side. Alongside an impressive and brilliantly acted cast of Elisabeth Moss, Jonathan Pryce, Krysten Ritter, Dree Hemingway, and Josephine de La Baum, we follow the sardonic and narcissistic Philip as he awaits the publication of his second novel, fresh off the success of his debut. In an attempt to escape the city to write, and avoid the deteriorating relationship with his girlfriend (Moss), Philip flees for an isolated summer home owned by his literary idol (Pryce). Guided by an omnipresent narrator, shot on beautiful 16mm, and featuring a silky jazz score by Keegan DeWitt, Listen Up Philip possesses a refreshingly timeless touch that is as intricately-crafted as it is brutal.
Bitterly Charming: Jason Schwartzman Gets Abrasive for ‘Listen Up Philip’
“I started reading the script and 10 or 15 pages into it I was put off by the character and blown away by some of the things he would consider saying to people,” says Jason Schwartzman on first reading Alex Ross Perry’s Listen Up Philip. “I felt like I needed to take a break…like I need to get out of here for a second.” But for Schwartzman, he found himself being pulling him back for more, eventually falling under the spell of Perry’s caustically charming world. And for a film about the personal and artistic struggles of a misanthropic novelist grappling with his latest work and the foibles of his love life, it’s only fitting that Schwartzman experienced reading the script the way he would a good book—piece by piece, finishing one chapter and allowing time for it to sink in before devouring the next.
For the undeniably lovable Schwartzman, whose strange and shrewd sense of comedic timing and talent has won over audiences since his wonderful breakout performance in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, Listen Up Philip allows him to show his nastier, more sadistic side. Alongside an impressive and brilliantly acted cast of Elisabeth Moss, Jonathan Pryce, Krysten Ritter, Dree Hemingway, and Josephine de La Baum, we follow the sardonic and narcissistic Philip as he awaits the publication of his second novel, fresh off the success of his debut. In an attempt to escape the city to write, and avoid the deteriorating relationship with his girlfriend (Moss), Philip flees for an isolated summer home owned by his literary idol (Pryce). Guided by an omnipresent narrator, shot on beautiful 16mm, and featuring a silky jazz score by Keegan DeWitt, Listen Up Philip possesses a refreshingly timeless touch that is as intricately-crafted as it is brutal.
Bitterly Charming: Jason Schwartzman Gets Abrasive for ‘Listen Up Philip’
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I think that’s a huge part of adolescence that nobody wants to admit. There’s a lot of lying, there’s a lot of self-deception, there’s a lot of putting yourself in situations that you pretend were fun. You rewrite your own history. You look back and think, yeah, that was great, but underneath it is something much more complicated.
Exploring Sexual Awakening, Self-Deception, & Pushing Boundaries With Director Eliza Hittman
I think that’s a huge part of adolescence that nobody wants to admit. There’s a lot of lying, there’s a lot of self-deception, there’s a lot of putting yourself in situations that you pretend were fun. You rewrite your own history. You look back and think, yeah, that was great, but underneath it is something much more complicated.
Exploring Sexual Awakening, Self-Deception, & Pushing Boundaries With Director Eliza Hittman
I think that’s a huge part of adolescence that nobody wants to admit. There’s a lot of lying, there’s a lot of self-deception, there’s a lot of putting yourself in situations that you pretend were fun. You rewrite your own history. You look back and think, yeah, that was great, but underneath it is something much more complicated.
Exploring Sexual Awakening, Self-Deception, & Pushing Boundaries With Director Eliza Hittman
I think that’s a huge part of adolescence that nobody wants to admit. There’s a lot of lying, there’s a lot of self-deception, there’s a lot of putting yourself in situations that you pretend were fun. You rewrite your own history. You look back and think, yeah, that was great, but underneath it is something much more complicated.
Exploring Sexual Awakening, Self-Deception, & Pushing Boundaries With Director Eliza Hittman
I think that’s a huge part of adolescence that nobody wants to admit. There’s a lot of lying, there’s a lot of self-deception, there’s a lot of putting yourself in situations that you pretend were fun. You rewrite your own history. You look back and think, yeah, that was great, but underneath it is something much more complicated.
Exploring Sexual Awakening, Self-Deception, & Pushing Boundaries With Director Eliza Hittman
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Your characters are always on very insular journeys, which leads me to believe solitude is something of great importance to you and your work. 
I have a very complicated relationship to solitude, and I think the way I work actually reflects that because I write my own script. Solitude means a lot to me and it’s very important for me; I love it, I need it, it’s kind of an obsession. Like when I’m promoting a film I truly suffer being not being on my own and not having time to write. But at the same time, I hate solitude, it’s my demon. I’ve always been scared of solitude, so I’ve always lived with somebody. I was never living on my own except for the one time I did and I was extremely unhappy. So I guess this thing with solitude, this complex or ambiguous relationship to solitude, finds its way in my films too. I enjoy so much filming people walking alone, that’s something that comes back in my films. It’s a kind of obsession and a sum up of this theme of solitude.
But there are varying degrees of solitude. There’s solitude that’s a choice, a decision to be by oneself, and then there’s the solitude that feels more like a lack—when your missing someone or feeling a certain void and “alone” becomes “without.”
What you just said is exactly is what I was meaning to say. For me, when I was saying I miss solitude now it’s because it’s not solitude. When I write a film and work on a film, I never feel solitude as being solitude. So yes, I really have the same feeling about this duality, that there are two kinds of solitude. For me the solitude that I get as a filmmaker is never the painful solitude, it’s always the happy solitude, which was not the case before I was a filmmaker, which was why I enjoy being a filmmaker so much.
Going Between Melancholy & Euphoria With Director Mia Hansen-Løve
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We’d finish our day and then I’d either be with Abel or I’d be on the phone with Abel and the writer, and we’d be working on what we’re doing the next day. So outside of sleep, and he did enter my dreams, that’s what we’re doing. I’s fluid like that, and that’s another reason why I like Abel, it’s scary and it’s chaotic but it’s alive and we bang away. So there’s really no rest and no going away. While normally I used to always say, oh I don’t stay in character, when the camera’s turned off everything goes back inside me and I’m just ol’ Willem from Wisconsin. But the truth is, when you’re working twelve hours a day in a certain frame of mind and you’re willing identification and you want to inhabit a set of situations and thoughts, it transforms you.
Willem Dafoe on Becoming Pier Paolo Pasolini for Abel Ferrara
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 I needed to be in a state of creation, because let’s say I have this scene and we shot it 82 times—we often did 82 takes or sometimes 95 and sometimes 100—and I know what I’m going to use in this notebook that I have where I wrote very dramatic scenes, and I knew that this would help. But at a certain point after 30 takes, this thing that worked doesn’t work anymore, so you take another one and then another one and then another, and then you’re out of material. So then you have to create more, and I loved it. Actually, sometimes I would ask for more takes when we were on take 80 and when I did that, the crew was like, okay she’s definitely totally out of her mind.

I’ve worked with directors who would do a lot of takes and you don’t understand why and it’s super frustrating. You lose a little bit of your character because you yourself are like, again, but why? With the Daridennes, each new take I knew why I would have to do it again, and even when we did 95 takes it was okay for me because I understood why. So you’re in this energy of creativity and I actually loved it. Of course now today when I’m talking with you and saying we did 82 takes I’m like, did you really do that? But at that time I never felt exhausted, on the contrary, I felt this energy that was holding me.
INTERVIEW: Marion Cotillard Unpacks Her ‘Suitcase of Drama’ for the Dardenne Brothers
 I needed to be in a state of creation, because let’s say I have this scene and we shot it 82 times—we often did 82 takes or sometimes 95 and sometimes 100—and I know what I’m going to use in this notebook that I have where I wrote very dramatic scenes, and I knew that this would help. But at a certain point after 30 takes, this thing that worked doesn’t work anymore, so you take another one and then another one and then another, and then you’re out of material. So then you have to create more, and I loved it. Actually, sometimes I would ask for more takes when we were on take 80 and when I did that, the crew was like, okay she’s definitely totally out of her mind.

I’ve worked with directors who would do a lot of takes and you don’t understand why and it’s super frustrating. You lose a little bit of your character because you yourself are like, again, but why? With the Daridennes, each new take I knew why I would have to do it again, and even when we did 95 takes it was okay for me because I understood why. So you’re in this energy of creativity and I actually loved it. Of course now today when I’m talking with you and saying we did 82 takes I’m like, did you really do that? But at that time I never felt exhausted, on the contrary, I felt this energy that was holding me.
INTERVIEW: Marion Cotillard Unpacks Her ‘Suitcase of Drama’ for the Dardenne Brothers
 I needed to be in a state of creation, because let’s say I have this scene and we shot it 82 times—we often did 82 takes or sometimes 95 and sometimes 100—and I know what I’m going to use in this notebook that I have where I wrote very dramatic scenes, and I knew that this would help. But at a certain point after 30 takes, this thing that worked doesn’t work anymore, so you take another one and then another one and then another, and then you’re out of material. So then you have to create more, and I loved it. Actually, sometimes I would ask for more takes when we were on take 80 and when I did that, the crew was like, okay she’s definitely totally out of her mind.

I’ve worked with directors who would do a lot of takes and you don’t understand why and it’s super frustrating. You lose a little bit of your character because you yourself are like, again, but why? With the Daridennes, each new take I knew why I would have to do it again, and even when we did 95 takes it was okay for me because I understood why. So you’re in this energy of creativity and I actually loved it. Of course now today when I’m talking with you and saying we did 82 takes I’m like, did you really do that? But at that time I never felt exhausted, on the contrary, I felt this energy that was holding me.
INTERVIEW: Marion Cotillard Unpacks Her ‘Suitcase of Drama’ for the Dardenne Brothers
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She made this joke, saying, “I can be the unfaithful wife and you can be my lover.” But it was more just about the fact that again we were going to be separated physically for two months, and it’s complicated to live with an actor and I don’t know what she does in Paris. She’s not at all in a spirit of acting, she comes from theater and she writes a lot for the stage and has the nature of somebody that is more shy and discreet, not the image you have of the cliche of an actress.
So I think it was the fact that we were physically separated, me with the book over there and her working on it in Paris. But I mean it’s all in the book! It says, “Why didn’t you think of kissing her?” “Because she was too tall.” Okay. And then it says that she’s brunette and his wife is blonde, it’s written like that. Okay. And then this thing about Julien not knowing who she really was, that he thought she was a cold statue of a woman. So after realizing that, I couldn’t see any other body or face than Stephanie! 
I talked to the wonderful Mathieu Amalric about his new film THE BLUE ROOM.

She made this joke, saying, “I can be the unfaithful wife and you can be my lover.” But it was more just about the fact that again we were going to be separated physically for two months, and it’s complicated to live with an actor and I don’t know what she does in Paris. She’s not at all in a spirit of acting, she comes from theater and she writes a lot for the stage and has the nature of somebody that is more shy and discreet, not the image you have of the cliche of an actress.
So I think it was the fact that we were physically separated, me with the book over there and her working on it in Paris. But I mean it’s all in the book! It says, “Why didn’t you think of kissing her?” “Because she was too tall.” Okay. And then it says that she’s brunette and his wife is blonde, it’s written like that. Okay. And then this thing about Julien not knowing who she really was, that he thought she was a cold statue of a woman. So after realizing that, I couldn’t see any other body or face than Stephanie! 
I talked to the wonderful Mathieu Amalric about his new film THE BLUE ROOM.

She made this joke, saying, “I can be the unfaithful wife and you can be my lover.” But it was more just about the fact that again we were going to be separated physically for two months, and it’s complicated to live with an actor and I don’t know what she does in Paris. She’s not at all in a spirit of acting, she comes from theater and she writes a lot for the stage and has the nature of somebody that is more shy and discreet, not the image you have of the cliche of an actress.
So I think it was the fact that we were physically separated, me with the book over there and her working on it in Paris. But I mean it’s all in the book! It says, “Why didn’t you think of kissing her?” “Because she was too tall.” Okay. And then it says that she’s brunette and his wife is blonde, it’s written like that. Okay. And then this thing about Julien not knowing who she really was, that he thought she was a cold statue of a woman. So after realizing that, I couldn’t see any other body or face than Stephanie! 
I talked to the wonderful Mathieu Amalric about his new film THE BLUE ROOM.
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When Mathieu Amalric is on screen, it’s impossible to take your eyes off him. There’s a distinct manic energy that emanates from inside the French actor and pours into the myriad characters he takes on . Whether he’s continuing his career-long collaboration with Arnaud Desplechin, appearing in roles for Wes Anderson, starring in films from icons like Roman Polanski and Alain Resnais, or playing a Bond villain, Amalric’s presence wraps you in a giddy pleasure, as you admire his ability to be completely devoured by a role while still carrying the spark that makes him so fascinating.

This year alone, we’ve seen him in Polanski’s Venus in Fur, Desplechin’s Jimmy P, Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, Pascale Ferran’s Bird People, and Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu’s Love Is the Perfect Crime, but for Amalric, his ambitions were not always set in front of the camera. After training to be a director from the likes of Louis Malle, Amalric fell into acting after working with Desplechin on La sentinelle in 1992, and it wouldn’t be until 2010 that he made his first sensation as a director with the burlesque portrait On Tour (Tournée). And this past May, his most recent directorial effort The Blue Room (La chambre bleue) premiered at Cannes ahead of its US debut at NYFF this week and its theatrical release tomorrow.

Adapted from George Simenon’s novel of the same title, Amalric stars in the sensual and elegant erotic noir, alongside his partner and co-writer Stéphanie Cléau and French actress Léa Drucker. The Blue Room follows Julien and Esther, an adulterous man and a married woman whose torrid affair takes place in the blue room of a country hotel. Possessed by her love for him and her belief that he shares her plans for a future together, her desire turns to madness, as his life slowly becomes unraveled in her wake. Beautifully shot and austerely told, the film exposes the dangers of lust and the harrowing pain of guilt, examining  the boundaries between love and obsession. 
Chatting With Mathieu Amalric on His New Erotic Noir ‘The Blue Room’
When Mathieu Amalric is on screen, it’s impossible to take your eyes off him. There’s a distinct manic energy that emanates from inside the French actor and pours into the myriad characters he takes on . Whether he’s continuing his career-long collaboration with Arnaud Desplechin, appearing in roles for Wes Anderson, starring in films from icons like Roman Polanski and Alain Resnais, or playing a Bond villain, Amalric’s presence wraps you in a giddy pleasure, as you admire his ability to be completely devoured by a role while still carrying the spark that makes him so fascinating.

This year alone, we’ve seen him in Polanski’s Venus in Fur, Desplechin’s Jimmy P, Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, Pascale Ferran’s Bird People, and Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu’s Love Is the Perfect Crime, but for Amalric, his ambitions were not always set in front of the camera. After training to be a director from the likes of Louis Malle, Amalric fell into acting after working with Desplechin on La sentinelle in 1992, and it wouldn’t be until 2010 that he made his first sensation as a director with the burlesque portrait On Tour (Tournée). And this past May, his most recent directorial effort The Blue Room (La chambre bleue) premiered at Cannes ahead of its US debut at NYFF this week and its theatrical release tomorrow.

Adapted from George Simenon’s novel of the same title, Amalric stars in the sensual and elegant erotic noir, alongside his partner and co-writer Stéphanie Cléau and French actress Léa Drucker. The Blue Room follows Julien and Esther, an adulterous man and a married woman whose torrid affair takes place in the blue room of a country hotel. Possessed by her love for him and her belief that he shares her plans for a future together, her desire turns to madness, as his life slowly becomes unraveled in her wake. Beautifully shot and austerely told, the film exposes the dangers of lust and the harrowing pain of guilt, examining  the boundaries between love and obsession. 
Chatting With Mathieu Amalric on His New Erotic Noir ‘The Blue Room’
When Mathieu Amalric is on screen, it’s impossible to take your eyes off him. There’s a distinct manic energy that emanates from inside the French actor and pours into the myriad characters he takes on . Whether he’s continuing his career-long collaboration with Arnaud Desplechin, appearing in roles for Wes Anderson, starring in films from icons like Roman Polanski and Alain Resnais, or playing a Bond villain, Amalric’s presence wraps you in a giddy pleasure, as you admire his ability to be completely devoured by a role while still carrying the spark that makes him so fascinating.

This year alone, we’ve seen him in Polanski’s Venus in Fur, Desplechin’s Jimmy P, Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, Pascale Ferran’s Bird People, and Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu’s Love Is the Perfect Crime, but for Amalric, his ambitions were not always set in front of the camera. After training to be a director from the likes of Louis Malle, Amalric fell into acting after working with Desplechin on La sentinelle in 1992, and it wouldn’t be until 2010 that he made his first sensation as a director with the burlesque portrait On Tour (Tournée). And this past May, his most recent directorial effort The Blue Room (La chambre bleue) premiered at Cannes ahead of its US debut at NYFF this week and its theatrical release tomorrow.

Adapted from George Simenon’s novel of the same title, Amalric stars in the sensual and elegant erotic noir, alongside his partner and co-writer Stéphanie Cléau and French actress Léa Drucker. The Blue Room follows Julien and Esther, an adulterous man and a married woman whose torrid affair takes place in the blue room of a country hotel. Possessed by her love for him and her belief that he shares her plans for a future together, her desire turns to madness, as his life slowly becomes unraveled in her wake. Beautifully shot and austerely told, the film exposes the dangers of lust and the harrowing pain of guilt, examining  the boundaries between love and obsession. 
Chatting With Mathieu Amalric on His New Erotic Noir ‘The Blue Room’
When Mathieu Amalric is on screen, it’s impossible to take your eyes off him. There’s a distinct manic energy that emanates from inside the French actor and pours into the myriad characters he takes on . Whether he’s continuing his career-long collaboration with Arnaud Desplechin, appearing in roles for Wes Anderson, starring in films from icons like Roman Polanski and Alain Resnais, or playing a Bond villain, Amalric’s presence wraps you in a giddy pleasure, as you admire his ability to be completely devoured by a role while still carrying the spark that makes him so fascinating.

This year alone, we’ve seen him in Polanski’s Venus in Fur, Desplechin’s Jimmy P, Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, Pascale Ferran’s Bird People, and Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu’s Love Is the Perfect Crime, but for Amalric, his ambitions were not always set in front of the camera. After training to be a director from the likes of Louis Malle, Amalric fell into acting after working with Desplechin on La sentinelle in 1992, and it wouldn’t be until 2010 that he made his first sensation as a director with the burlesque portrait On Tour (Tournée). And this past May, his most recent directorial effort The Blue Room (La chambre bleue) premiered at Cannes ahead of its US debut at NYFF this week and its theatrical release tomorrow.

Adapted from George Simenon’s novel of the same title, Amalric stars in the sensual and elegant erotic noir, alongside his partner and co-writer Stéphanie Cléau and French actress Léa Drucker. The Blue Room follows Julien and Esther, an adulterous man and a married woman whose torrid affair takes place in the blue room of a country hotel. Possessed by her love for him and her belief that he shares her plans for a future together, her desire turns to madness, as his life slowly becomes unraveled in her wake. Beautifully shot and austerely told, the film exposes the dangers of lust and the harrowing pain of guilt, examining  the boundaries between love and obsession. 
Chatting With Mathieu Amalric on His New Erotic Noir ‘The Blue Room’
When Mathieu Amalric is on screen, it’s impossible to take your eyes off him. There’s a distinct manic energy that emanates from inside the French actor and pours into the myriad characters he takes on . Whether he’s continuing his career-long collaboration with Arnaud Desplechin, appearing in roles for Wes Anderson, starring in films from icons like Roman Polanski and Alain Resnais, or playing a Bond villain, Amalric’s presence wraps you in a giddy pleasure, as you admire his ability to be completely devoured by a role while still carrying the spark that makes him so fascinating.

This year alone, we’ve seen him in Polanski’s Venus in Fur, Desplechin’s Jimmy P, Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel, Pascale Ferran’s Bird People, and Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu’s Love Is the Perfect Crime, but for Amalric, his ambitions were not always set in front of the camera. After training to be a director from the likes of Louis Malle, Amalric fell into acting after working with Desplechin on La sentinelle in 1992, and it wouldn’t be until 2010 that he made his first sensation as a director with the burlesque portrait On Tour (Tournée). And this past May, his most recent directorial effort The Blue Room (La chambre bleue) premiered at Cannes ahead of its US debut at NYFF this week and its theatrical release tomorrow.

Adapted from George Simenon’s novel of the same title, Amalric stars in the sensual and elegant erotic noir, alongside his partner and co-writer Stéphanie Cléau and French actress Léa Drucker. The Blue Room follows Julien and Esther, an adulterous man and a married woman whose torrid affair takes place in the blue room of a country hotel. Possessed by her love for him and her belief that he shares her plans for a future together, her desire turns to madness, as his life slowly becomes unraveled in her wake. Beautifully shot and austerely told, the film exposes the dangers of lust and the harrowing pain of guilt, examining  the boundaries between love and obsession. 
Chatting With Mathieu Amalric on His New Erotic Noir ‘The Blue Room’
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23 Films to See This Week: Godard, Oppenheimer, Ferrara + More