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What’s the primary difference between British and American humor? 
Americans don’t like the idea of revealing weakness, and if they do it’s very muted. Americans don’t like losers, while British really like losers. Americans like winners. Even if a person screws up, they basically have to be a winner at the end of the day. I don’t think Americans like looking at ugly people, either. Everyone has to be very good looking. That is, unless they are really interesting or it’s an old person—then they can be ugly. However, the upside is that you Americans try to look inside yourselves, understand yourselves and what makes you tick. We don’t do that in England. We’d rather kill ourselves then have any type of psychoanalysis. The upside is that we express affection for each other by taking the piss out of each other and mocking each other. We don’t really say “I Love You” in England. That’s why we’re oppressed emotionally. But it makes for better comedy, I think, when you’re ruder to each other.
Steve Coogan on Gentleman’s’ Clubs, The Trip, & Fighting with Co-Star Rob Brydon
  1. What’s the primary difference between British and American humor? 

    Americans don’t like the idea of revealing weakness, and if they do it’s very muted. Americans don’t like losers, while British really like losers. Americans like winners. Even if a person screws up, they basically have to be a winner at the end of the day. I don’t think Americans like looking at ugly people, either. Everyone has to be very good looking. That is, unless they are really interesting or it’s an old person—then they can be ugly. However, the upside is that you Americans try to look inside yourselves, understand yourselves and what makes you tick. We don’t do that in England. We’d rather kill ourselves then have any type of psychoanalysis. The upside is that we express affection for each other by taking the piss out of each other and mocking each other. We don’t really say “I Love You” in England. That’s why we’re oppressed emotionally. But it makes for better comedy, I think, when you’re ruder to each other.

    Steve Coogan on Gentleman’s’ Clubs, The Trip, & Fighting with Co-Star Rob Brydon

  1. 445 notesTimestamp: Wednesday 2011/06/15 8:17:00Source: Blackbookhwfilmcelebscomedythe trip
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    What’s the primary difference between British and American humor?
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    steve coogan
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    hahaha
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    I don’t like either of these men much but oh my this is true
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    What’s the primary difference between British and American humor? Americans don’t like the idea of revealing weakness,...
  20. magnetic-rose reblogged this from kissmyfass and added:
    Steve Coogan is one of the most underrated comedians of all time, imo. Alan Partridge, Paul Calf, Duncan Thicket etc are...