BlackBook
blackbookmag.com
Speaking to Pat’s socially jarring nature, Russell said, “I love how uncomfortable people are at the beginning of the movie. People say, ‘Oh Bradley Cooper, The Hangover. I’m uncomfortable. He’s a very scary character.  What’s he going to do next?’” But in watching the film, what proved so fascinating to me was how relatable everything and everyone feels. It hits on a guttural level that allows you to identify with the characters even at their worst, recognizing their faults and flaws as your own. Each dealing with their own anxieties and disorders, these characters are not sketches of a person scrapped together or extreme examples meant to teach a lesson. Rather, they are all simply people trying to deal with something beyond their grasp in the best way they can. It feels as if you are peering through a window on your neighbor, slightly frightened and enticed by the situation at hand, but knowing that when you return home, someone could be thinking the same thing watching you. And that’s where the genius of the writing comes into play. Russell’s dialogue never feels forced or contrived, and there’s immediacy with each word. “That is, as Frank Sinatra once said, the whole trick of the record to me,” Russell said. “You feel like you’re spying on people. And everybody has to trick themselves, when I’m writing I have to trick myself as a writer, you have trick yourself into being in a moment and that’s one of my favorite things about the film.”
Getting To The Heart Of David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook
  1. Speaking to Pat’s socially jarring nature, Russell said, “I love how uncomfortable people are at the beginning of the movie. People say, ‘Oh Bradley Cooper, The Hangover. I’m uncomfortable. He’s a very scary character.  What’s he going to do next?’” But in watching the film, what proved so fascinating to me was how relatable everything and everyone feels. It hits on a guttural level that allows you to identify with the characters even at their worst, recognizing their faults and flaws as your own. Each dealing with their own anxieties and disorders, these characters are not sketches of a person scrapped together or extreme examples meant to teach a lesson. Rather, they are all simply people trying to deal with something beyond their grasp in the best way they can. It feels as if you are peering through a window on your neighbor, slightly frightened and enticed by the situation at hand, but knowing that when you return home, someone could be thinking the same thing watching you. And that’s where the genius of the writing comes into play. Russell’s dialogue never feels forced or contrived, and there’s immediacy with each word. “That is, as Frank Sinatra once said, the whole trick of the record to me,” Russell said. “You feel like you’re spying on people. And everybody has to trick themselves, when I’m writing I have to trick myself as a writer, you have trick yourself into being in a moment and that’s one of my favorite things about the film.”

    Getting To The Heart Of David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook

  1. 113 notesTimestamp: Wednesday 2012/11/14 12:55:00Source: Blackbookhwsilver linings playbookfilm
  1. rewrite-yourthoughts reblogged this from bbook
  2. hotjmess reblogged this from bbook and added:
    Adore this movie and love Bradley of course.
  3. haridonerd2112 reblogged this from bbook
  4. bmonb reblogged this from bbook
  5. jackgarland reblogged this from bbook
  6. highlydisregarded reblogged this from bbook
  7. cynniweb reblogged this from bbook
  8. sweetcarolinemusic reblogged this from bbook and added:
    So unbelievably excited to see this film!! The entire cast is amazing (Bradley Cooper, Robert De Niro, Jennifer...
  9. manrayban reblogged this from bbook
  10. huee reblogged this from bbook
  11. kaleidoscopeyes reblogged this from meldachevelure
  12. meldachevelure reblogged this from bbook
  13. tifa-08 reblogged this from bbook
  14. runningsoul reblogged this from bbook
  15. megawoman reblogged this from bbook