BlackBook
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BlackBook
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Michelangelo Antonioni and Monica Vitti, photographed by Walter Daran, 1961.
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This is everything.
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saloandseverine:

Guy Bourdin, 1987 
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wandrlust:

Philippe Petit on WTC Ibeam, 1974 — Jim R. Moore
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See Marion Cotillard and Joaquin Phoenix in the Trailer for James Gray’s ‘The Immigrant’
See Marion Cotillard and Joaquin Phoenix in the Trailer for James Gray’s ‘The Immigrant’
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Carlo Mollino, Teatro Regio, Torino, 1965 - 1973
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keyframedaily:

Chris Marker's workbook for the creation of La Jetée (1962).
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tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
tarkovskologist:

Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1990s
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Looking back, needless to say it was very, very intense, but I feel very fortunate to have survived it and very fortunate that I was hard-wired in a certain way that allowed me gravitate towards something like cinema. Had I not had an interest in cinema, or anything remotely artistic, I have no idea how I would have processed half of it, to be honest. So the whole thing is, once you step away from that, you go into the real world. You’re forced to deal with people, and you realize that the way people are communicating is fundamentally different than the way you’ve been communicating in your close-knit family. You either have enough insight to reprogram yourself from it in some way shape or form—the difference between this is the way the world is and this is not the way the world was inside house that you grew up in. So there was definitely a transitional thing that I had to go through for a very long time until I understood things better and had more persecutive on how the world functions.
TARNATION: 20 Years in the Making, 10 Years Puncturing Our Hearts
Looking back, needless to say it was very, very intense, but I feel very fortunate to have survived it and very fortunate that I was hard-wired in a certain way that allowed me gravitate towards something like cinema. Had I not had an interest in cinema, or anything remotely artistic, I have no idea how I would have processed half of it, to be honest. So the whole thing is, once you step away from that, you go into the real world. You’re forced to deal with people, and you realize that the way people are communicating is fundamentally different than the way you’ve been communicating in your close-knit family. You either have enough insight to reprogram yourself from it in some way shape or form—the difference between this is the way the world is and this is not the way the world was inside house that you grew up in. So there was definitely a transitional thing that I had to go through for a very long time until I understood things better and had more persecutive on how the world functions.
TARNATION: 20 Years in the Making, 10 Years Puncturing Our Hearts
Looking back, needless to say it was very, very intense, but I feel very fortunate to have survived it and very fortunate that I was hard-wired in a certain way that allowed me gravitate towards something like cinema. Had I not had an interest in cinema, or anything remotely artistic, I have no idea how I would have processed half of it, to be honest. So the whole thing is, once you step away from that, you go into the real world. You’re forced to deal with people, and you realize that the way people are communicating is fundamentally different than the way you’ve been communicating in your close-knit family. You either have enough insight to reprogram yourself from it in some way shape or form—the difference between this is the way the world is and this is not the way the world was inside house that you grew up in. So there was definitely a transitional thing that I had to go through for a very long time until I understood things better and had more persecutive on how the world functions.
TARNATION: 20 Years in the Making, 10 Years Puncturing Our Hearts